Courtesy of SAAB
// MANNED AIRCRAFT

340 Maritime Surveillance Aircraft

// DESCRIPTION

The 340 maritime surveillance aircraft was introduced by SAAB in 2012 and is a re-design of the civil 340 specifically designed for coastal security.

Many birds, one stone: The multi-role 340 maritime surveillance aircraft is built to handle a number of different mission assignments beyond surveillance of blue and coastal waters to combat illegal fishing. It also operates as maritime search and rescue and is designed for medical evacuation, oil spill detection and management, fisheries inspection and management and surveillance to counter maritime smuggling.

Bells and whistles: The 340 maritime surveillance aircraft is able to perform a high variety of missions due to its range of accompanying equipment. Key features include a 360° rotating maritime surveillance radar, retractable electro-optical/infrared sensors and radio direction finder and tactical communications. These on-board sensors allow the aircraft to monitor large maritime areas, day and night and in adverse weather conditions such as snow, fog or rain.

Communication is key: The Saab 340 is equipped with Ethernet and WiFi, secure-AIS data links and a satellite communications system to ensure continuous data and voice communications capabilities.

// SPECIFICATIONS

Maximum Operating Altitude: 7,620 meters
Maximum Cruise Speed: 265 knots
Range: 2,611 kilometers
Endurance: 9+ hours

// DATA SHEET
  • Company: SAAB

  • Type: Manned Aircraft

  • Direct Cost: Estimated $20 million for the plane (reuters.com)

  • Indirect Cost: Optional auxiliary fuel tank to enhance performance.

  • Link: Product Website
// GET IN TOUCH

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MANU SAN FELIX/Courtesy of National Geographic Society

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